How to convert your furniture schedule data into a SIF file

Easily convert your Canvas furniture schedule data into a SIF file to use with software for contract office furniture specification and procurement.

What is the SIF file format?

The Simple Interchange Format (SIF) is a text-based file format used for data interchange between systems. It typically consists of key-value pairs, where each key represents a specific attribute of a product or configuration, and the value is the corresponding data. The keys and values are separated by an equal sign (=), and each pair is usually placed on a new line. Entries (which represent individual records, such as products) are separated by a blank line.

Need to convert a schedule into SIF for import into Spec or Worksheet?

Click here for a step by step process on how to do it.

Structure of a SIF File

  1. Key-Value Pairs:

    • Each line contains a key and its corresponding value in the format key=value.

    • If a value is not available, the format key= is used, leaving the value empty.

  2. Entry Separation:

    • Each entry (e.g., a product) is separated by a blank line to distinguish between different records.

Example SIF File

Here's an example of a SIF file format:

PN=102813-
PD=*Cut Key,UM Series
MC=FMS
GC=R
P1=2.00
P2=2.40
P4=10.00
P5=99.00
WT=0.00
VO=0.00
NT=1
G0=0000126471

PN=1B2JK7-
PD=*Lock Plug and Key,Chrome UM Series
MC=FMS
GC=R
P1=10.00
P2=12.00
P4=10.00
P5=99.00
WT=0.00
VO=0.00
NT=1
G0=0000126471

PN=232092-
PD=*Lock Plug and Key,Black UM Series
MC=FMS
GC=R
P1=10.00
P2=12.00
P4=10.00
P5=99.00
WT=0.00
VO=0.00
NT=1
G0=0000126471

Key Elements of a SIF File

  • PN (Part Number): Unique identifier for the part or product.

  • PD (Product Description): Description of the product.

  • MC (Manufacturer Code): Code representing the manufacturer.

  • GC (Group Code): Group or category code.

  • P1, P2, P4, P5 (Price Points): Various price-related fields.

  • WT (Weight): Weight of the product.

  • VO (Volume): Volume of the product.

  • NT (Count/Flag): Numeric value indicating a count or specific flag.

  • G0, G1, etc. (Group Identifiers): Additional group-related information.

Usage

SIF files are useful for:

  • Data Interchange: Transferring product information between different systems in a structured and standardized format.

  • Data Import/Export: Facilitating the import and export of data between systems, ensuring consistency and accuracy.

The example provided gives a basic overview of how data is structured in a SIF file. The actual keys and their meanings may vary depending on the specific application and requirements of the systems involved.

Schema Definition

The common schema consists of several key-value pairs, where each key represents a specific attribute of a product or configuration. The keys are derived from analyzing the provided data files and identifying common elements.

Key-Value Pairs

Each entry in the SIF file is defined by a set of key-value pairs. Below is the detailed specification of each key:

  1. CR (Creation/Reference Code)

    • Description: Code indicating creation or a specific reference.

    • Format: String

  2. G0, G1, G2, G3, G4, G5 (Group Identifiers)

    • Description: Identifiers for grouping related items.

    • Format: String

  3. GC (Group Code)

    • Description: Code representing the group category.

    • Format: String

  4. MC (Manufacturer Code)

    • Description: Code representing the manufacturer.

    • Format: String

  5. NT (Count/Flag)

    • Description: Numeric value indicating a count or a specific flag.

    • Format: Integer

  6. O1, O2, O4, O5 (Option Fields)

    • Description: Fields representing various options or configurations.

    • Format: String or Numeric, depending on context.

  7. OD (Option Description)

    • Description: Description of the option.

    • Format: String

  8. OG (Option Group)

    • Description: Group to which the option belongs.

    • Format: String

  9. ON (Option Number)

    • Description: Numeric identifier for the option.

    • Format: Integer

  10. P1, P2, P4, P5 (Price Points)

    • Description: Different price points or values associated with the product.

    • Format: Decimal

  11. PD (Product Description)

    • Description: Description of the product.

    • Format: String

  12. PN (Part Number)

    • Description: Identifier for the part number.

    • Format: String

  13. PO (Purchase Order)

    • Description: Identifier related to purchase orders.

    • Format: String

  14. SL (Storage/Layout)

    • Description: Information related to storage or layout.

    • Format: String

  15. SO (Sales Order)

    • Description: Identifier related to sales orders.

    • Format: String

  16. TO (Transaction Order)

    • Description: Identifier related to transaction orders.

    • Format: String

  17. VO (Volume)

    • Description: Volume measurement.

    • Format: Decimal

  18. WT (Weight)

    • Description: Weight measurement.

    • Format: Decimal

Example of an Empty SIF Entry

Below is an example of an empty SIF entry following the common schema. Each key is present, but the values are empty.

CR=
G0=
G1=
G2=
G3=
G4=
G5=
GC=
MC=
NT=
O1=
O2=
O4=
O5=
OD=
OG=
ON=
P1=
P2=
P4=
P5=
PD=
PN=
PO=
SL=
SO=
TO=
VO=
WT=

File Structure

  • Each product or configuration entry is separated by a blank line.

  • Each attribute within an entry is represented as key=value.

  • If an attribute value is empty, the format is key=.

This specification ensures a standardized format for all SIF files generated using the common schema, facilitating seamless data integration and interchange across various systems.

Yes, SIF files can contain links to other files. However, this depends on the specific implementation and the system using the SIF file. In a general context, SIF files are designed to store structured data in key-value pairs, and you can include URLs or file paths as values associated with specific keys.

To include links to other files in a SIF file, you can add key-value pairs where the value is the URL or file path to the other file. Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Identify the Key: Determine the appropriate key in your schema to store the link. This could be a new key or an existing one like Product URL, Image URL, or similar.

  2. Add the Link as a Value: Ensure the value associated with the key is the URL or file path to the other file.

Example SIF Entry with Links

Here’s an example of a SIF entry that includes links to other files:

makefileCopy codePN=12345
PD=Example Product
MC=Example Manufacturer
P1=100.00
P2=90.00
P4=10.00
P5=5.00
VO=0.5
WT=1.0
G0=Example Vendor
GC=Example Category
NT=10
ProductURL=https://example.com/product/12345
ImageURL=https://example.com/images/product_12345.jpg
  1. Prepare Your Data: Ensure your CSV or other source data includes columns for the links you want to include (e.g., Product URL, Image URL).

  2. Map the Columns to SIF Keys: When using CanoaGPT to convert your data to a SIF file, map these columns to appropriate keys in the SIF schema.

  3. Generate the SIF File: CanoaGPT will include the links in the SIF file as part of the conversion process.

Accessing your Furniture Schedule:

How to download a furniture schedule

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